Kids Smart
Kids Smart Milk Buttons

Kids Smart

Growing Healthy Kids
5 Superfoods For Your Heart
Articles

5 Superfoods For Your Heart

Keeping your heart healthy is as much about putting the right nutrients in to your body as it is about keeping the wrong substances out.  Foods that contain saturated fats, salt and high levels of processed sugar are all "No-no's" (as is smoking). If you are concerned about your heart, eating well and avoiding the above foods and toxins may help. Eating more of the below 5 superfoods for a healthy heart may also be of benefit to overall heart health. Looking after your heart is serious business. As this article is being written, heart disease is the leading underlying cause of death in Australia. If you have serious concerns about heart health, talking to your doctor should be your first step. Eating the foods below may help support your heart, but just eating these foods and neglecting other lifestyle factors that can contribute to heart problems will not guarantee a healthy heart.  

5 Superfoods For Your Heart

 

1. Salmon

Salmon is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which can help reduce your risk of heart disease according to the Australian Heart Foundation. Omega-3 may also help reduce inflammation of blood vessels and reduce blood clotting. Try our Chia-Crusted Salmon recipe for a tasty, healthy way to get more salmon into your diet.  

2. Chia Seeds

Chia Seeds are - like salmon - rich in omega-3. In fact, on a pund-for-pound basis, chia seeds contain more omega-3 than salmon. Furthermore, chia seeds are rich in fibre. Diets high in fibre can reduce the risk of heart disease. Try our Chia Cacao Coconut Cluster recipe for a treat that you won't believe is heart-healthy.  

3. Tofu and/or Soy Milk

Both of these food sources contain niacin, folate, calcium magnesium and potassium. These nutrients are crtitical to help support the heart. Try our Banana Split Smoothie recipe - a delicious way to drink soy milk and top up fibre, protein and antioxidants.  

4. Acai

Acai is packed with antioxidants. Antioxidants are important for helping prevent potential cellular damage caused by free radicals - unstable molecules that are present in our body and attack cells in an effort to stabilise themselves. This damage can cause inflammation, and antioxidants can thus protect our body from the inflammation. Inflammation can be an aggravating factor in heart disease. Preliminary studies also suggest acai may be helpful for reducing blood sugar levels and cholesterol levels. Try our Acai Berry Breakfast recipe for a heart healthy start to the date.  

5. Cacao

You may have heard of studies that suggest a potential link between daily (dark) chocolate consumption and heart health. This link is likely because dark chocolate (60-70% cocoa) is rich in polyphenols: substances that can help reduce clotting, blood pressure and inflammation. What you may not know is that dark chocolate, and the cocoa used to make it, are actually the nutritionally inferior by-products of raw cacao. Raw cacao is rich in a number of nutrients that are critical for supporting heart health. It is the base ingredient used to make cocoa / dark chocolate (cacao is processed and cooked to turn it into cocoa, whihc is then processed further to create dark chocolate. This processing and cooking destroys much of the original nutritional content, so choosing cacao over cocoa is a good idea). Try our Choc Chilli Cacao Mousse recipe for a decadent, heart-friendly dessert. ------ This article is presented by our online health partner Health365. To buy Nature's Way Superfoods online, visit www.health365.com.au/shop.
5 Benefits of CoQ10
Articles

5 Benefits of CoQ10

CoQ10 (co-enzyme Q10) is a substance found in our body that is ..
Nature’s Way Super Greens Plus
Featured Video

Nature’s Way Super Greens Plus

Super Greens Plus is one of the most nutritionally dense greens ..
Your Diet And PMS
Articles

Your Diet And PMS

Do a foul mood, weight gain and uncontrollable food cravings sound all too familiar? Your diet could be making your premenstrual syndrome (PMS) symptoms worse. PMS affects up to 30% of women during their childbearing years. For those who struggle to control their symptoms every month, it can be quite a nightmare. PMS symptoms can be varied and may include anxiety, mood swings, depression, tearfulness, irritability, fatigue, breast tenderness, swelling and pain, weight gain, water retention, insomnia, dizziness, headaches, migraine, cramps, backache and cravings for various types of food. These symptoms usually start about 7 to 10 days before the onset of menstruation, increasing in severity as menstruation approaches. Most women experience the worst symptoms during their actual period and, in some cases, afterwards. PMS occurs more commonly in women over the age of 30.  

Possible causes of PMS

Research on PMS is still in its early stages, and no single nutritional or hormonal imbalance has been consistently identified as the cause of this syndrome. However, a variety of theories have been proposed. These include:

1. Hormonal Imbalances

Not just imbalances of the female hormones such as progesterone and oestrogen, but also of hormones produced by the adrenal glands, which may be involved with water-retention symptoms.  

2. Imbalances in neurotransmitters

For example, an imbalance in serotonin production could cause symptoms such as cravings for sweet foods and depression.  

3. FATTY ACID METABOLISM DISORDERS

An imbalance in the omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acid ratio (due to inadequate or unbalanced intakes) can lead to the production of certain compounds called prostaglandins. These can affect brain and nerve function, and/or cause inflammatory-type reactions.  

4. DEFICIENCIES OF NUTRIENTS, SUCH AS VITAMIN B6

This could lead to irritability, fatigue, depression and other symptoms.  

Research On PMS and Diet

International research studies have produced the following preliminary results:
  • In one study, test subjects who took 50mg of vitamin B6 a day reported improvements in depression, irritability and fatigue, but not in other symptoms of PMS.
  • Studies using essential fatty acids such as omega-3 and 6 fatty acids have produced positive outcomes in relieving symptoms, particularly breast tenderness, swelling and pain. The use of 1 to 2g of evening primrose oil (gamma-linolenic acid, an omega-6 essential fatty acid) significantly reduced PMS symptoms, particularly painful breasts.
  • Another study found that women who took up to 1,200mg of calcium on a daily basis reported significantly fewer PMS symptoms than women in the control group.
  • Some studies indicate that there’s also a link between stress and PMS, i.e. women who struggle to cope with stress often struggle with PMS symptoms, which are often also more severe than in women who are more relaxed.
 

Solutions to PMS

At this stage, scientists and doctors can only make general recommendations for the control of PMS symptoms. Try some or all of the following steps, eliminating those that don’t produce a beneficial effect after 3 months:
  • Consult your doctor or gynaecologist to check if you’re suffering from hormone deficiencies. If you lack female hormones (either progesterone or oestrogen, or both), your doctor may prescribe hormone supplements.
  • Ask your doctor to prescribe a mild diuretic that you can take during the 7-10 days when the symptoms appear. This should help to control swelling and water retention.
  • Do everything in your power to control stress: do yoga, Pilates or another form of exercise, do a few breathing exercises, meditate, or consider psychotherapy to learn how to manage your stress.
  • Do regular exercise – not just when the symptoms strike (when you may not feel up to doing exercise anyway).
  • Get sufficient sleep and, if you suffer from insomnia, try drinking a glass of warm, low-fat milk before you go to bed. Milk is rich in tryptophan, an amino acid that boosts serotonin production.
  • Follow a balanced diet that contains plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables, unprocessed cereals and grains, lean meat, fish, low-fat milk and dairy products, and margarine or oils rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and vitamin E.
  • Take B-complex supplements that contain vitamin B6.
  • Take a calcium supplement if you’re not drinking sufficient low-fat milk or eating other high-calcium foods such as low-fat yoghurt, cottage cheese, and other cheeses.
  • Reduce your intake of caffeine (coffee, tea, cola and energy drinks containing caffeine) and sweetened cold drinks.
  • Don’t smoke.
  • If you suffer from cravings, try to resist them, as eating large amounts of salty or sweet foods will make the symptoms worse. Nibble on healthy snacks such as fruit (fresh and dried, for potassium that controls water retention), wholewheat crackers or bread with cottage cheese (provides B6 and calcium) or fresh vegetables like carrots and celery sticks (also high in potassium), and low-fat milk drinks or yoghurt (for calcium and tryptophan).
  • Take evening primrose oil supplements to increase your omega-6 intake or, better still, take a supplement that contains both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids.
  • Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are increasingly used as therapy for severe PMS. Speak to your doctor about a possible prescription of one of these antidepressants if none of the above steps improve your symptoms.
 

Superfoods for PMS

In addition to the above tips, you may also like to try the following superfoods to help manage PMS. They contain key nutrients that support women's health, hormonal balance and may help reduce PMS symptoms: Maca: try our Banana, Maca and Quinoa porridge recipe. Cacao: try our Banana Split Smoothie recipe. Chia Seeds: try our Berry Breakfast Pudding recipe. ------ This article was provided by our online health partner Health365. For more information on women's health issues, visit www.health365.com.au.
Chocolate Date Balls
Featured Recipe
Risk Factors for Heart Disease
Articles

Risk Factors for Heart Disease

Heart disease is the leading underlying cause of death in Australia. ..
Kids Smart Drops