50+ Health

Making some small changes to your lifestyle as you age can help reduce your chance of certain age-related diseases and help keep you feeling - and looking - younger. Read on for more on how you can look after your health as you age.
50+ Health
View the 50+ Range
Explore Our Products

View the 50+ Range

View the full range of products to support healthy ageing.
Training tips to avoid joint damage.
Articles

Training tips to avoid joint damage.

Whether you are already feeling the onset of sore / stiff joints, have early arthritis symptoms are are just trying to avoid joint pain as you age, there are some simple things you can do to protect your joints and limit further damage and inflammation during exercise.  
  1. Learn to lift

Whether it be in the gym, at the workplace or around the house, you need to learn how to lift heavy objects safely. Learning to lift heavy objects appropriately can not only save your back, but it can also save your joints. For heavy objects that are placed on the ground, squat down and lift with your legs rather than your back. If you feel strain or pressure in your knees or hips, stop and ask someone for help. When carrying heavy objects, hold them close to your body so your core takes the pressure rather than elbow and shoulder joints.  
  1. Recognise over-use

Suffering joint pain after prolonged use? Chances are you may be suffering a minor joint injury or an over-use injury. With injury, the fluids and cartilage that protect the joint can become damaged. This, in turn, can allow the bones to rub against each other and further injure the joint. If you have unexpected / sudden joint pain, try to limit use and see a health professional as soon as possible. Continuing to use an injured joint can make the injury worse and may cause permanent or more severe damage.  
  1. Stay trim, stay strong

Retaining a healthy body weight is important to protect your joints. Each kilogram you lose means up to 4 kilograms less pressure on your knees, hips and ankles as you walk... lose 12 kilograms and that’s nearly 50 kilos less pressure! Furthermore, focusing on maintaining strength through regular exercise or resistance training can help stabilise joints, meaning less wear and tear and lower chance of injury.  
  1. Go for low impact exercises

Exercise has so many critical benefits for our health, and it would be a shame to let sore joints or arthritis stop us from enjoying those benefits. However, exercise can often be damaging to joints: we have already mentioned that walking adds 4 kilograms of pressure per kilogram of body weight to our joints. Running adds an extra 10 kilograms of joint pressure per kilogram of body weight! The more pressure we place on a  joint, the more wear and tear we get on the protective tissues in the joint. The more damage to  the protective tissues, the greater the chance of permanent damage and arthritis. Low impact exercises like pilates or cycling can be more friendly for joints... see our article on exercises for arthritis sufferers for more ideas of low-impact exercises to help protect your joints.  
  1. Feed your joints

There are two nutrients that actually feed your joints and help your body grow and repair connective tissues in the joints. Glucosamine and Chondroitin work well in tandem to actively feed your joints and promote cartilage health... cartilage is critical for protecting your joint and acting as a shock absorber. ------- This article was provided by our online partner Health365. For more information on dealing with arthritis, visit www.health365.com.au.    
4 Tips To Help Avoid Osteoporosis
Articles

4 Tips To Help Avoid Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is common in Australia, especially among middle-aged to elderly women. It is a condition where bone density reduces over time. Less dense bones are more porous and brittle, which greatly increases the chance of suffering breaks or fractures. Osteoporosis has no cure, but it is preventable. Following these 4 simple tips can reduce your risk of osteoporosis.  

1. Increase Calcium Intake

Calcium is the single most important nutrient for helping develop and maintain strong, healthy bones. Adult males need about 1000mg of calcium each day, and women need ~1300mg. Teenagers and breastfeeding women can need up to 1500mg a day... that is the equivalent of 5 glasses of milk. Eating a variety of foods can help you increase your calcium intake, but if you are specifically concerned about getting enough calcium each day, you may like to try a calcium supplement to top up calcium levels and give your bones the nutrition they need.  

2. Increase Vitamin D Intake.

Vitamin D increases the amount of calcium our body can absorb. There's no point in increasing your calcium intake if your body simply isn't effectively absorbing that additional calcium. Vitamin D is produced by our body when we get direct sunlight on our skin. If you don't spend time in the sun each day, you might like to try a Vitamin D3 supplement to top your levels up and support calcium absorption. Many calcium supplements already have added Vitamin D.  

3. Do Weight Bearing Exercise

There are several studies that show that weight bearing exercise (eg/ walking or running) can help increase / maintain bone density long term. But don't overdo it - other studies show that over-training can cause a drop in oestrogen in females. Low oestrogen levels are a risk factor for brittle, porous bones.  

4. Increase Vitamin K-2

The University of Maryland Medical Centre website (www.umm.edu) notes that low vitamin K2 levels individuals have been found in individual with osteoporosis. It is thought that Vitamin K-2 helps calcium bind to bones... like vitamin D, vitamin K2 can help your body get more out of the dietary calcium that you are taking in. ------ This article is an excerpt from a longer Osteoporosis article by Health365.com.au. For more information on how to avoid osteoporosis, visit www.health365.com.au.
Glucosamine For Arthritis
Articles

Glucosamine For Arthritis

Glucosamine is perhaps the single most commonly used supplement when ..
Glucosamine 1500mg
Products

Glucosamine 1500mg

Did you know that just one tablet of Nature's Way Glucosamine can help to protect, renew and rebuild joint tissue? The Glucosamine we use is considered the most important nutrient for the protection of joints and forms a 'cushioning' effect of the joints and surrounding tissues. Available in two pack sizes - 121 tablets or 200 tablets.
Super Krill Plus Calamari Oil
Featured Product

Super Krill Plus Calamari Oil

Helps the 6 concerns of healthy ageing.
5 Surprising Benefits of Omega-3
Articles

5 Surprising Benefits of Omega-3

We all know omega-3s are good for your health. We also know the benefits of omega-3 range from protecting your heart, brain and eyes to supporting joint health and reducing inflammation. The definitive list of omega-3 benefits would certainly be a long one - there are tens of thousands of academic studies of the benefits of omega-3 intake. We take a look at some surprising, lesser known benefits of omega-3.  

1. Omega-3 may help sleep

Recent research from Oxford University has produced a number of fascinating insights into the importance of a particular type of omega-3 and children's learning. In these studies, children with low levels of 'DHA' (a specific type of omega-3) scored significantly worse on tests for memory, behaviour, concentration, reading and numeracy than children who had sufficient DHA levels. Furthermore, the researchers consequently noted that increasing DHA levels in the children with low DHA by using a DHA supplement helped them improve their performance and bridge the gap to their peers. Increasing DHA levels increased learning outcomes. What does this have to do with sleep? The Oxford team have recently expanded on their study. Their most recent results show that low DHA levels also can lead to poor sleep in children.  Giving a DHA  supplement to the children in the study with low DHA levels improved the quality of their sleep.  

2. Omega-3 may support male fertility

A 2010 study published in The Journal of Clinical Nutrition looked at the relationship  between omega-3 fatty acid concentrations in fertile and infertile men. Fertile men tended to have higher omega-3 levels than infertile men. Further research is required to consolidate and expand on these findings. However, the results from the study do echo the findings of several animal studies in rats and guppies - both animal studies showed a link between fertility and omega-3 levels.  

3. Omega-3s may protect ageing brains

From the University of Maryland's overview of omega-3 research: "A number of studies show that reduced intake of omega-3 fatty acids is associated with increased risk of age related cognitive decline. Scientists believe the omega-3 fatty acid DHA is protective against age related cognitive decline."  

4. Omega-3s may support stronger bones.

Calcium, magnesium and vitamin D may not be the only nutrients for supporting strong bones. Several studies have looked at the relationship between omega-3 intake and bone density. Whilst further research is required, there is preliminary evidence to suggest there may be a link between omega-3 levels and maintaining bone density over time.  

5. Omega-3 may help menstrual pain

Preliminary research and anecdotal evidence suggests women who take fish oil during menstruation may experience a decline in menstrual pain.
Causes of High Cholesterol
Articles

Causes of High Cholesterol

High cholesterol is quite often only discovered once a serious, related health problem is discovered. In order to stop high cholesterol levels before they lead to serious health problems, regular GP check-ups and knowing the leading causes of high cholesterol are the best ways to manage cholesterol risk. In this article, we outline some of the main causes of high cholesterol you need to be aware of. If you have serious concerns about cholesterol, you should contact your doctor promptly.  

Causes of High Cholesterol

 

1. Diet

Diets high in saturated fats can cause cholesterol  problems. This includes animal fats in meats like pork, veal, beef, milk, eggs, butter, most biscuits and crisps and many fried foods.  

2. Obesity

There is a well documented link between obesity and high cholesterol. Maintaining a healthy body weight can help maintain a healthy cholesterol level and reduces your risk of developing other cardiovascualr / heart conditions.  

3. Physical Activity

People living sedentary lifestyles not only have a higher risk of cholesterol problems, but also a range of heart-related health problems.  

4. Gender and Age

After age 20 (give or take a few years) cholesterol levels naturally begin to rise. In men, cholesterol levels tend to plateau around age 50. Women's cholesterol levels rise later in life, and often increase after menopause. Whilst you cannot control your gender or age, the above can help you be aware of which stage in your life  you need to start paying more attention to cholesterol levels.  

 5. Genetics

Some factors involved in heart disease and high cholesterol cannot be controlled. If there is a family history of heart disease or high cholesterol, there may be a genetic pre-disposition to blame.  

6. Smoking

Add "Increased risk of cholesterol problems" to the long, long list of reasons why you should not be smoking. Smoking reduces good cholesterol levels, and increase your risk of hundreds of other diseases including heart disease, heart attack, hypertension, stroke and arterial disease. ------ This article was provided by our online health partner Health365. For more information on managing cholesterol, visit www.health365.com.au.
Tips For Choosing The Best Krill Oil
Articles

Tips For Choosing The Best Krill Oil

The benefits of krill oil are becoming increasingly well documented, ..
Extra Strength Krill Oil 60s
Products

Extra Strength Krill Oil 60s

Ideal for those who are concerned with / may experience: - Symptoms of mild osteoarthritis - Heart and Cardiovascular health