50+ Health

Making some small changes to your lifestyle as you age can help reduce your chance of certain age-related diseases and help keep you feeling - and looking - younger. Read on for more on how you can look after your health as you age.
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Glucosamine For Arthritis
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Glucosamine For Arthritis

Glucosamine is perhaps the single most commonly used supplement when treating patients with arthritis. If you are suffering arthritis, it is critical to understand the role of glucosamine in joint health. Glucosamine can be of benefit to you if you are suffering sore joints, have early arthritis symptoms or are simply a very active person who wants to protect active, aching or potentially injured joints.  

What is Glucosamine?

Glucosamine is a nutrient required for the production of cartilage. Why is cartilage critical for joint health? Well, without cartilage (the soft, spongy tissue that acts as a shock absorber in our joints) our bones would rub against one another and be terribly painful. Cartilage is important because it stops serious joint wear and permanent joint injury.  

How do I get Glucosamine?

Glucosamine is actually a sugar that is naturally produced by our bodies. However, as we age, our body produces less of it.  As such, we may need to take a glucosamine supplement in order to keep our glucosamine levels topped up. The recommended daily dose of glucosamine is 1500mg. Whilst you can get glucosamine from food, it is found in the shells of crustacenas and offal - both foods that are not particularly friendly to the palate. This is why we recommend glucosamine supplements like Nature's Way 1500mg Glucosamine if you are interested in increasing your glucosamine levels.  

What are glucosamine’s side effects?

There are some side effects of glucosamine that - although rare - you should be aware of. These include increased blood-pressure, rapid heart rate and heart palpitations. However, these side effects are actually quite rare in otherwise healthy individuals. More common side-effects include drowsiness and temporary gas / indigestion / diarrhoea. If you are on blood thinning medication or have concerns about your heart health, see your health professional before trying glucosamine supplements.  

A Final Note

It is worth noting that glucosamine does not necessarily work for all people suffering arthritis or joint pain. Like many supplements, taking our 1500mg glucosamine tablet each day is just one way to keep your nutrient levels topped up to give your body an edge in fighting degenerative disease. Taking glucosamine is not a complete cure for arthritis, but research does show it is one of a small handful of ways to effectively protect your joints and slow down degenerative joint conditions like arthritis. ------- This article was provided by our online partner Health365. For more information on http://health365.com.au/articles/joint-health/what-is-glucosamine, visit www.health365.com.au.
4 Tips To Help Avoid Osteoporosis
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4 Tips To Help Avoid Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is common in Australia, especially among middle-aged to elderly women. It is a condition where bone density reduces over time. Less dense bones are more porous and brittle, which greatly increases the chance of suffering breaks or fractures. Osteoporosis has no cure, but it is preventable. Following these 4 simple tips can reduce your risk of osteoporosis.  

1. Increase Calcium Intake

Calcium is the single most important nutrient for helping develop and maintain strong, healthy bones. Adult males need about 1000mg of calcium each day, and women need ~1300mg. Teenagers and breastfeeding women can need up to 1500mg a day... that is the equivalent of 5 glasses of milk. Eating a variety of foods can help you increase your calcium intake, but if you are specifically concerned about getting enough calcium each day, you may like to try a calcium supplement to top up calcium levels and give your bones the nutrition they need.  

2. Increase Vitamin D Intake.

Vitamin D increases the amount of calcium our body can absorb. There's no point in increasing your calcium intake if your body simply isn't effectively absorbing that additional calcium. Vitamin D is produced by our body when we get direct sunlight on our skin. If you don't spend time in the sun each day, you might like to try a Vitamin D3 supplement to top your levels up and support calcium absorption. Many calcium supplements already have added Vitamin D.  

3. Do Weight Bearing Exercise

There are several studies that show that weight bearing exercise (eg/ walking or running) can help increase / maintain bone density long term. But don't overdo it - other studies show that over-training can cause a drop in oestrogen in females. Low oestrogen levels are a risk factor for brittle, porous bones.  

4. Increase Vitamin K-2

The University of Maryland Medical Centre website (www.umm.edu) notes that low vitamin K2 levels individuals have been found in individual with osteoporosis. It is thought that Vitamin K-2 helps calcium bind to bones... like vitamin D, vitamin K2 can help your body get more out of the dietary calcium that you are taking in. ------ This article is an excerpt from a longer Osteoporosis article by Health365.com.au. For more information on how to avoid osteoporosis, visit www.health365.com.au.
5 Surprising Benefits of Omega-3
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5 Surprising Benefits of Omega-3

We all know omega-3s are good for your health. We also know the ..
Kombucha Pomegranate and Apple
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Kombucha Pomegranate and Apple

Nature’s Way Kombucha (kom-boo-cha) is nature’s naturally sparkling low sugar health drink that is refreshing and delicious. Kombucha is known to be full of the goodness of naturally occurring probiotics.
Super Krill Plus Calamari Oil
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Super Krill Plus Calamari Oil

Helps the 6 concerns of healthy ageing.
Exercises For Arthritis Sufferers
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Exercises For Arthritis Sufferers

Despite how tempting it may be to rest stiff, aching joints, it is important for arthritis sufferers to maintain regular exercise. In addition to helping reduce inflammation and stabilising joints, the right arthritis exercise program has a huge range of other benefits. These exercises for arthritis can also increases energy, help maintain bone / muscle mass and boost heart & brain health. Believe it or not, the below exercises for arthritis can also help fight the ageing process. With exercise offering so many benefits, we’d be mad to let arthritis stop us from doing it. (NOTE: if your arthritic pain is truly too severe to allow exercise, it is critical that you contact your health professional for assistance). Let’s take a look at some of the ‘joint-friendly’ exercise options available to arthritis sufferers:  
  1. Swimming

Swimming is a great low-impact option that gives your entire body a workout. With your joints suspended in water, the pain associated with other stop-start exercises like tennis or high-impact exercises like running is hugely reduced. In addition to being a great whole-body exercise, swimming is an excellent way to unwind. Try swimming once or twice a week, but be sure to compliment it with some weight bearing exercises like walking to help maintain bone health.  
  1. Cycling

Like swimming, cycling is low impact, meaning less pressure is placed on your joints. A great lower body and cardio workout, you can choose between getting out on the road and getting some fresh air or saddling up on the exercise bike at your local gym.  
  1. Light resistance / weight training

Warning: resistance training for arthritis sufferers should be approached with caution. Poor technique or pushing yourself to lift heavy weights can cause damage to arthritic joints. However, if done correctly, you can build muscle and the strength of joints. This results in greater joint stability and can help arthritic symptoms. If you are interested in starting weight training for arthritis, we recommend you contact a professional fitness trainer.  
  1. Walking

Walking is another low impact exercise that gives significant benefit to arthritis sufferers. Find a walking buddy to keep you motivated, and try to find different routes to walk to keep things interesting. Keeping the pace up will help ensure you raise your blood pressure to get the blood pumping. Aim for 30-45 minutes 4 times a week, and keep the pace sufficient that you are puffing slightly.  
  1. Pilates

Pilates is a great way to relax whilst strengthening muscles that support and stabilise your joints. It consists of a range of stretches, poses and exercises that focus on getting your body moving in unison. It can also increase your flexibility, which can also help reduce arthritic pain. Many community centres offer pilates classes for free or a small fee because it has such wide-ranging benefits. If you are interested in trying pilates, ask your local doctor, community centre or gym. ------ Do you suffer from arthritis? Let us know your favourite way to exercise in the comments section below. This article was provided by our online partner Health365. For more information on dealing with arthritis, visit www.health365.com.au.
Training tips to avoid joint damage.
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Training tips to avoid joint damage.

Whether you are already feeling the onset of sore / stiff joints, have early arthritis symptoms are are just trying to avoid joint pain as you age, there are some simple things you can do to protect your joints and limit further damage and inflammation during exercise.  
  1. Learn to lift

Whether it be in the gym, at the workplace or around the house, you need to learn how to lift heavy objects safely. Learning to lift heavy objects appropriately can not only save your back, but it can also save your joints. For heavy objects that are placed on the ground, squat down and lift with your legs rather than your back. If you feel strain or pressure in your knees or hips, stop and ask someone for help. When carrying heavy objects, hold them close to your body so your core takes the pressure rather than elbow and shoulder joints.  
  1. Recognise over-use

Suffering joint pain after prolonged use? Chances are you may be suffering a minor joint injury or an over-use injury. With injury, the fluids and cartilage that protect the joint can become damaged. This, in turn, can allow the bones to rub against each other and further injure the joint. If you have unexpected / sudden joint pain, try to limit use and see a health professional as soon as possible. Continuing to use an injured joint can make the injury worse and may cause permanent or more severe damage.  
  1. Stay trim, stay strong

Retaining a healthy body weight is important to protect your joints. Each kilogram you lose means up to 4 kilograms less pressure on your knees, hips and ankles as you walk... lose 12 kilograms and that’s nearly 50 kilos less pressure! Furthermore, focusing on maintaining strength through regular exercise or resistance training can help stabilise joints, meaning less wear and tear and lower chance of injury.  
  1. Go for low impact exercises

Exercise has so many critical benefits for our health, and it would be a shame to let sore joints or arthritis stop us from enjoying those benefits. However, exercise can often be damaging to joints: we have already mentioned that walking adds 4 kilograms of pressure per kilogram of body weight to our joints. Running adds an extra 10 kilograms of joint pressure per kilogram of body weight! The more pressure we place on a  joint, the more wear and tear we get on the protective tissues in the joint. The more damage to  the protective tissues, the greater the chance of permanent damage and arthritis. Low impact exercises like pilates or cycling can be more friendly for joints... see our article on exercises for arthritis sufferers for more ideas of low-impact exercises to help protect your joints.  
  1. Feed your joints

There are two nutrients that actually feed your joints and help your body grow and repair connective tissues in the joints. Glucosamine and Chondroitin work well in tandem to actively feed your joints and promote cartilage health... cartilage is critical for protecting your joint and acting as a shock absorber. ------- This article was provided by our online partner Health365. For more information on dealing with arthritis, visit www.health365.com.au.    
Causes of High Cholesterol
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Causes of High Cholesterol

High cholesterol is quite often only discovered once a serious, ..
Extra Strength Krill Oil 60s
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Extra Strength Krill Oil 60s

Ideal for those who are concerned with / may experience: - Symptoms of mild osteoarthritis - Heart and Cardiovascular health