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How Probiotics Help With Antibiotics
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How Probiotics Help With Antibiotics

Antibiotics are commonly prescribed drugs that inhibit or kill the growth of micro-organisms in the body. They are used either:

  1. as a primary intervention to treat bacterial infection or
  2. to prevent infection (following surgery, for instance).
While antibiotics are highly effective, they can also lead to a number of unpleasant side effects. One of these side effects is the death of a large amount of 'good' bacteria, causing a bacterial imbalance in your gut. This, in turn,  causes several common anti-biotic side effects such as diarrhoea and nausea. Other side effects also include intestinal discomfort and flatulence. This is simply because, along with killing harmful bacteria (as was intended), antibiotics also destroy many of the important, beneficial micro-organisms that make up the intestinal flora and help digestion and good health.

How do Probiotics Help?

Taking a probiotic (a supplement of food that contains more of this 'good bacteria') can help to restore the balance of beneficial bacteria in the gut that is often affected by antibiotics. This additional 'good' bacteria helps a number of digestive and immune functions in our body, and importantly prevents the proliferation of 'bad' bacteria which can make us sick. As such, taking a probiotic can work to either minimise the severity of, or totally negate, the unpleasant side effects of taking antibiotics. A healthy balance of “good” bacteria is important for maintaining everyday health, digestive health and immunity and probiotics help you achieve this.

Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium lactis in particular have been shown to be effective in preventing antibiotic-associated imbalances. In a double-blind controlled study, patients who received both antibiotics and Lactobacillus did not develop diarrhoea. This result is particularly important for elderly and immune-compromised people.

If you are taking a course of antibiotics, taking a probiotic during and for several weeks after can help to replenish gut flora balance. It is recommended that probiotics are taken at least two hours from antibiotics, within 30 minutes of eating or as recommended by your healthcare professional.

Want to know more about probiotics and immunity? Check out our range of digestion and probiotic products.

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This article was provided by our friends at health365. For mroe information on the benefits of probiotics, visit Health365.com.au.

How Pre- and Probiotics Boost Immunity
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How Pre- and Probiotics Boost Immunity

Pre- and probiotics could be powerful immunity boosters. Are you getting enough of the good stuff? This article takes a closer look at the effect of pre-and probiotics on boosting your immunity, ability to avoid disease and ability to get better faster once you become sick.

What are Probiotics?

It’s a strange thought, but right from the moment we’re born, the human body becomes a host for other microorganisms. This includes the beneficial bacteria in our intestinal tracts, simply called “probiotics”.

These bacteria have daunting names such as “Lactobacillus acidophilus”, “Bifidobacterium bifidum” and “Bifidobacteria infantis”, but without them our immune systems wouldn’t be able to function as it should. These beneficial bacteria perform a number of important functions and also keep harmful bacteria in our gut in balance. Probiotics stop these bad bacterias from running rampant in our digestive tracts. This is one explanation as to how probiotics help us avoid illness... they help stop bad bacteria from getting out of control and making us sick.

What are Prebiotics?

We have established that probiotics are beneficial bacteria that can help improve our health and immunity. “Prebiotics”, on the other hand, are food components that improve the food supply for micro-organisms in our gastrointestinal tracts. Prebiotics give the beneficial bacteria (i.e. probiotics) nourishment and thus a chance to grow and flourish. Our prebiotic levels can be naturally boosted by eating lots of fruit and vegetables. Some probiotic supplements, such as Restore 30 Billion Probiotic and Restore Bowel and Colon Probiotic have added prebiotics to help probiotics survive and grow in our stomach.

Beneficial bacteria in babies

Before birth, a baby’s gastrointestinal tract is totally sterile. This means that it doesn’t contain any bacteria – not even the “good” ones. During the natural birth process, the baby receives some beneficial bacteria from the mother – organisms that immediately start to multiply, boosting the little one’s immunity.

Preliminary research shows that these good bacteria (mostly Bifidobacteria infantis) can decrease the growth of so-called Rota viruses, known for causing diarrhoea and thrush, thus protecting the new-born against common infections. The bacteria also seem to help prevent lactose intolerance, while increasing the absorption of minerals and B vitamins and boosting the infant’s immature immune system.

What’s more, Australian researchers recently discovered that probiotics can prevent a serious bowel condition called necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) in premature babies. In the study done at Sydney’s Nepean Hospital, in which a probiotic was mixed with breast milk and given to the babies, the healthy bacteria cut the risk of infection by 50%.

Breast milk also contains immune-boosting probiotics, which means that breastfeeding is another excellent way of increasing the number of Bifidobacteria in a baby’s intestinal tract.

Beneficial bacteria in adults

Adults have much bigger populations of gut bacteria, but only a few of these groups (e.g. Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria) seem to be beneficial to our health and capable of boosting immunity.

Several factors – such as stress, use of antibiotics, diarrhoea, an unhealthy diet, pollution, infections such as HIV/Aids, and ageing – can decrease our natural immunity and make us vulnerable to pathogens that cause disease. In addition, many harmful bacteria and viruses are becoming resistant to antibiotics, making treatment of common infections increasingly difficult.

Research shows that probiotics compete with harmful bacteria for food in the gastrointestinal tract, preventing them from multiplying and causing disease. They also seem to boost the uptake of important minerals, thus preventing deficiencies that could lower immunity.

The solution

Even though our understanding of probiotics is a work in progress, we can all potentially benefit from ingesting probiotic cultures.

Interestingly, the Bifidobacteria are the most common probiotics in the gastrointestinal system and also the good bacteria that decreases most as we age. It’s therefore important to take probiotic supplements or eat foods that contain live Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria. Examples of foods rich in these strains include yoghurt, soy milk, miso soup and our Nature's Way Probiotic Choc Balls.

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This article was provided by our online partner Health365. For more information on how probiotics support immunity, visit www.health365.com.au.

Which Probiotic should you use?
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Which Probiotic should you use?

Not all probiotics are created equal.... different 'strains' of ..
Nature's Way Activated Curcumin 30s
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Restore Probiotic Bowel & Colon
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Why You Need Fibre In Your Diet
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Why You Need Fibre In Your Diet

Increasing your fibre intake may - at first - seem like a bit of a contradiction. On the one hand, fibre not typically absorbed very well by the body. Why eat more of something that your body can't absorb? On the other hand, if your diet lacks fibre, you will definitely know about it. Let's take a closer look at why you need fibre.  

Why You Need Fibre

The benefits of fibre can best be studied by looking at what diets lacking in fibre can cause versus the benefits that diets rich in fibre offer. Diets low in fibre can lead to a number of health conditions, ranging from constipation and weight gain to fatigue and blood sugar fluctuations. Diets high in fibre generally lead to  much better overall health, weight management, more regular bowel movements, better digestion and a reduced risk of a range of serious diseases.  

The 2 types of fibre

There are two types of dietary fibre that are both subtly different, yet both are important for overall health.  

1. Soluble Fibre

Soluble fibre can be digested by your body, but usually very slowly compared to other carbohydrates. As a result, when you eat a diet rich in soluble fibre, the soluble fibre is digested slowly and can lead to more sustained energy and constant blood sugar levels after eating. High fibre diets can also help with weight loss, as the slow digestion of soluble fibre leads to longer feeling of fullness that may prevent snacking and a more prolonged energy release.  

Why You Need Soluble Fibre

Soluble fibre may help with:
  • cholesterol management
  • controlling blood sugar levels
  • inflammatory bowel conditions

Good Sources of Soluble Fibre

  • Oats
  • nuts
  • seeds
  • peas
  • Vegetables
 

2. Insoluble Fibre

We have established that soluble fibre can be digested, albeit slowly. Insoluble fibre, on the other hand, remains largely undigested as it passes through your digestive tract. Just because it is not digested does not mean it doesn't play a critical role in digestion and overall health. During digestion, insoluble fibre passes through to the intestine, bringing water with it. This increases bulk and hydration of waste products. In short, this helps you go to the bathroom more regularly and the additional water in your waste helps you avoid constipation. Insoluble fibre can also help promote a feeling of fullness for those looking to lose weight / reduce snacking.  

Why You Need Insoluble Fibre

Insoluble Fibre may help with:
  • maintaining regular bowel movement
  • weight management
 

Good sources of Insoluble fibre

  • leafy green vegetables
  • root vegetables
  • carrots
  • raisins
 

Superfoods For Fibre

Super Chia Seeds not only contains double the amount of fibre than oats, they also contain both soluble and insoluble fibre, so are a great way to top up your dietary fibre levels. Try them if you are actively looking for an easy way to increase your fibre intake.

Final Tips For Increasing Fibre

  • Adults need to get 25 to 30g of fibre each day. Most Australians do not get this much fibre. If you are struggling to get enough fibre in your diet, a fibre supplement like our Adult Fibre VitaGummies  may offer some benefit.
  • Sudden increases in dietary fibre may cause abdominal pain or flatulence. If you currently have a low fibre diet and are trying to increase your fibre levels, do so gradually over the course of several weeks.
  • Finally, increasing your fibre intake may require an increase in the amount of water you need to drink in a day. Since you pass more water as waste in a high fibre diet, increasing fibre intake may bring increased risk  of dehydration. Dry mouth, increased thirst, headache or dark coloured urine are all signs you may be dehydrated and need to drink more water.
------ This article was provided by our online health partner Health365. If you would like to learn more about why you need fibre (among other things), visit www.health365.com.au.
Benefits And Uses of Probiotics
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Benefits And Uses of Probiotics

Probiotics perform a wide range of functions important for maintaining good health. They can be particularly helpful in supporting digestive health. Probiotic supplements can be taken preventatively and are also often used to treat gastrointestinal problems.

So how do you know if you might benefit from a probiotic supplement? Signs of intestinal imbalance include bloating, flatulence, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, constipation and fungal overgrowth. Let's take a closer look at the benefits of probiotics and which conditions probiotics might be effective at helping treat.

 

1. Probiotics and Constipation

Constipation can be commonly treated with probiotics. Probiotics are specifically helpful in situations where constipation is caused by the improper or incomplete digestion of food. Such constipation is usually the result of imbalances in intestinal flora, and a probiotic supplement can help restore the imbalance. In this way, a probiotic may allow you to regain the ability to properly digest food.

 

2. Probiotics and Diarrhoea

At the other end of the scale, probiotics are also often indicated in the treatment of diarrhoea. Here they perform a dual role: firstly, a probiotic supplement can ensure that the gut flora remains healthy and well-balanced. This could speed up the return to normal defecation. Secondly, serious diarrhoea can cause the gut flora to become depleted, which can slow recovery. Supplementation of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus Plantarum seems to be particularly useful in treating diarrhoea. Traditionally, the Plantarum strain was administered alone, but modern best practice includes both Lactobacillus Plantarum and Lactobacillus Acidophilus for increased efficacy.

 

3. Probiotics for Gas & Bloating

Gas and bloating can often occur due to the improper digestion of foods in the stomach and intestine, and due to an overgrowth of a number of bacteria or a change in the type of bacteria in the small intestine. These bacteria often produce excess gas. Probiotics have been scientifically and clinically proven to improve intestinal health by promoting a healthy balance of good bacteria, and thereby reducing the harmful bacteria that produces gas and leads to bloating. To help reduce symptoms, ensure that Bifidobacterium strains are dominant in the human colon, as these are one of the most predominant cultures of ‘good’ bacteria that are found naturally. Lactobacillus acidophilis and Bifidobacterium lactis have extensive research individually and in combination in helping to improve intestinal health and digestive health (Liong 2007, Kopp 2001, Sinn D 2008).

 

4. Probiotics and Immune Support

The gastrointestinal tract functions as a barrier and immune system modulator. It is accepted that probiotics may directly or indirectly influence the host’s immune system. Recent studies show that probiotic strain B. Lactis enhances natural immune function by promoting the normalization of increased intestinal permeability, improving altered gut microecology, improvement of the immunologic barrier and alleviation of intestinal inflammatory responses, which produce a gut-stabilizing effect. Specific clinical trials using the combination of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis show an effect on the faecal microbiota as well as improvements in immunological parameters in healthy adults. They are able to modulate unspecific cellular immune responses by increasing phagocytic (white blood cell) activity (Liong 2007, Isolauri 2001, Klein 2008).

 

5. Probiotics and Lactose Intolerance

Probiotics have also been shown to be effective in helping people with lactose intolerance minimise their symptoms. Lactobacillus acidophilus in particular has been shown to be greatly effective in boosting levels of the lactose-digesting enzyme, lactase, in the gastrointestinal tract. Bloating, cramping, flatulence and diarrhoea can cause substantial discomfort to those with lactose intolerance, forcing them to adopt restricted diets. There is currently no cure for lactose intolerance, but certain treatments are available to improve individuals’ tolerance of lactose. Probiotics are increasingly recommended as a method to help people with lactose intolerance better digest lactose.

Which Probiotic Should You Use?

Use our Probiotic cheat sheet to help you work out which probiotic is best for you.

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This article was provided by our online health partner Health365. For more information on nutrition and digestive health, visit www.health365.com.au.

How Probiotics Can Improve Immunity
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How Probiotics Can Improve Immunity

Probiotics are beneficial for immunity due to a number of reasons. ..